Pogoplugged

Everyone seems to agree that the outgoing year 2011 was the year of the cloud. Judging by how often the word “cloud” was thrown at us by computer vendors, hosting companies, and service providers, it sounds like the greatest innovation since sliced bread. Of course, nothing could be farther from the truth. Cloud computing is not new at all. It has been around since the days of Multics and the ARPANET, at least conceptually. It is neither an invention nor a product, but an application of existing computer technologies, no matter how many companies now try to productise it now. The fuzzy term includes everything from network storage, utility computing, virtual server hosting, to service oriented architectures, typically delivered via the Internet (i.e. the cloud). In fact, the term is so blurry, that even the vendors themselves often disagree what it means, as famously Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle, before his company jumped on the bandwagon.

Pogoplug 2Most people associate the word cloud with file hosting services such as Dropbox, Windows Azure, or Apple’s iCloud. Today, I want to talk about a product that provides an alternative to these network storage services, which provides in my opinion a superior solution. It’s called Pogoplug and it is a box that comes in a flashy pink. The idea is simple enough. You connect this box with your Wifi router on one side and with your storage media on the other side, and voilà, you get networked storage, aka your own “personal cloud” which is accessible on your LAN as well as from outside via the Internet. Besides connecting the box, you have to get an account with pogoplug.com and register your device. Optionally, you can install software that makes the attached storage available on your LAN as an external mass storage device. There are also free apps for iOS and Android that that allow you to access Pogoplug-managed storage from your tablet and/or phone.

Why is this such a clever product? Well, for two reasons. First, the Pogoplug is low-cost and easy to use. Second, it provides solutions to multiple problems. Let’s start with the first. The basic Pogoplug device costs 50 USD, and the web account is free. You can plug up to four external hard disks or flash memory sticks into the four USB ports, so one could easily realise four or eight Terabyte total capacity. External hosting is expensive by comparison; for example, a 50 GB Dropbox account costs 10 USD per month; with Apple’s iCloud it’s 100 USD per year for the same size. There are cheaper alternatives, such as livedrive.com or justcloud.com, but the annual expense still exceeds the cost of a Pogoplug device. What’s the catch? The download speed via Internet is limited to the upload speed of your Internet connection, which for the average DSL user is typically lower than the access speed of an external file storage service. Filling the Pogoplug devices with data, on the other hand, is much faster, because you can access the drives locally.

Now, about the multiple solutions aspect. What I like about the Pogoplug device is that I can reuse my external backup disks as network storage. I work with redundant pairs of disks, whereas one disk is plugged into the Pogoplug at all times and the other disk is used to create backups from my computers. In the second step, I mount the Pogoplug to my Linux workstation and synchronise the online storage with the fresh backups via rsync. In addition, I use my Pogoplug as a household NAS and media server. This comes in very handy for viewing my photo library on a tablet, or for streaming audio from my music collection to my phone. As long as I stay within my house/garden’s Wifi range, the data transfer happens at Wifi speed. Streaming movies is a little trickier. Usually I download movies from the Pogoplug to the mobile device before viewing.

In summary, the product offers a miniature file server for local access via LAN/Wifi and remote access via Internet plus some streaming services. Authentication service is provided by the pogoplug.com web server. As of late, you also get 5GB free cloud storage space externally hosted by pogoplug.com, which is likewise accessible via mobile apps and can even be mounted into your local network. The pogoplug device itself consumes only 5W, less than most NAS or mini PC servers. Obviously, the power consumption increases when connected USB hard disks draw power from it, so the most energy-efficient solution is probably to use either flash memory sticks or USB-powered disks that stop spinning in idle mode. Additionally, the Pogoplug device can be deployed as a LAN print server. Those who are comfortable with Unix administration and scripting can program the Pogoplug device to do even more.

Website: www.pogoplug.com

Specifications:
1.2GHz ARM CPU with 256MB RAM plus 512MB Flash storage,
4 x USB2 ports, 1 x 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet port, integrated DC power supply
Supported Filesystems: NTFS, FAT32, Mac OS, Extended Journaled and non-Journaled (HFS+), EXT-2/EXT-3
Supported Browsers: Safari, Firefox 3, IE7, IE8, Chrome
Supported AV File Formats: H.264, MP4, AVI with motion JPEG, MP3